Tuvalu News

 

Greenpeace gives anti-whaling petition

Wednesday, January 18, 2006

Fiji Times

Greenpeace activists yesterday presented 2655 signed petitions to various ambassadors and high commissioners, urging them to actively lend their support for an end to commercial and scientific whaling.

Greenpeace' Oceans team leader Nilesh Gounder said the end to whaling was essential to prevent whales, who have a lifespan of between 90-100 years, from becoming extinct.

Larry Dinger, the US Ambassador to Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, Tonga and Tuvalu, accepted the petition from Greenpeace, saying that the US Embassy appreciated Greenpeace's interest and dedication to whale conservation and would deliver the petition to the appropriate authorities in Washington.

The whaling industry is blamed for the extinction of the North Atlantic grey whale and for the depletion of humpbacks, right whales, bowhead whales, fin whales, sei and blue whales. Japan and Norway are said to be the biggest hunters of whales responsible for killing more than 1000 whales every year.

"We are opposed to the current practice of lethal research whaling," said Mr Dinger.

"We have expressed our view to Japan on this matter forcefully and repeatedly over the last several years, including three times in 2005."

However, he said, they were very concerned about the perilous incidents reportedly taking place between whaling and NGO vessels in the Southern Ocean over the past several days.

"We believe that international differences over this issue can be permanently resolved only through the rule of law. Physical threats and violent confrontation will only prolong and further polarise this already contentious debate," said Mr Dinger.

The Greenpeace activists also asked that the Tuvalu, Nauru and Kiribati stop voting at the International Whaling Commission in Japan's favour.

Greenpeace activists yesterday presented 2655 signed petitions to various ambassadors and high commissioners, urging them to actively lend their support for an end to commercial and scientific whaling.

Greenpeace' Oceans team leader Nilesh Gounder said the end to whaling was essential to prevent whales, who have a lifespan of between 90-100 years, from becoming extinct.

Larry Dinger, the US Ambassador to Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, Tonga and Tuvalu, accepted the petition from Greenpeace, saying that the US Embassy appreciated Greenpeace's interest and dedication to whale conservation and would deliver the petition to the appropriate authorities in Washington.

The whaling industry is blamed for the extinction of the North Atlantic grey whale and for the depletion of humpbacks, right whales, bowhead whales, fin whales, sei and blue whales. Japan and Norway are said to be the biggest hunters of whales responsible for killing more than 1000 whales every year.

"We are opposed to the current practice of lethal research whaling," said Mr Dinger.

"We have expressed our view to Japan on this matter forcefully and repeatedly over the last several years, including three times in 2005."

However, he said, they were very concerned about the perilous incidents reportedly taking place between whaling and NGO vessels in the Southern Ocean over the past several days.

"We believe that international differences over this issue can be permanently resolved only through the rule of law. Physical threats and violent confrontation will only prolong and further polarise this already contentious debate," said Mr Dinger.

The Greenpeace activists also asked that the Tuvalu, Nauru and Kiribati stop voting at the International Whaling Commission in Japan's favour.

Greenpeace activists yesterday presented 2655 signed petitions to various ambassadors and high commissioners, urging them to actively lend their support for an end to commercial and scientific whaling.

Greenpeace' Oceans team leader Nilesh Gounder said the end to whaling was essential to prevent whales, who have a lifespan of between 90-100 years, from becoming extinct.

Larry Dinger, the US Ambassador to Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, Tonga and Tuvalu, accepted the petition from Greenpeace, saying that the US Embassy appreciated Greenpeace's interest and dedication to whale conservation and would deliver the petition to the appropriate authorities in Washington.

The whaling industry is blamed for the extinction of the North Atlantic grey whale and for the depletion of humpbacks, right whales, bowhead whales, fin whales, sei and blue whales. Japan and Norway are said to be the biggest hunters of whales responsible for killing more than 1000 whales every year.

"We are opposed to the current practice of lethal research whaling," said Mr Dinger.

"We have expressed our view to Japan on this matter forcefully and repeatedly over the last several years, including three times in 2005."

However, he said, they were very concerned about the perilous incidents reportedly taking place between whaling and NGO vessels in the Southern Ocean over the past several days.

"We believe that international differences over this issue can be permanently resolved only through the rule of law. Physical threats and violent confrontation will only prolong and further polarise this already contentious debate," said Mr Dinger.

The Greenpeace activists also asked that the Tuvalu, Nauru and Kiribati stop voting at the International Whaling Commission in Japan's favour.

Greenpeace Website

 

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